Bodkin v Bodkin by Emily Johns

Bodkin v Bodkin by Emily Johns

2 October 2014, London: An evening A celebration of the people and organisations that opposed the First World War and took action to stop it. 7.30pm, Torriano Meeting House, 99 Torriano Avenue, NW5 2RX. Hearing Eye in conjunction with Peace News has commissioned poster poems from Alan Brownjohn, Anna Robinson, Krysia Mansfield and Dan Kennedy. They will be performing their works alongside Chloe Mason – the great granddaughter of socialist, pacifist, suffragist and second-hand clothes dealer Alice Wheeldon, imprisoned in 1917 for the alleged attempted murder of Lloyd George – who will also be joining us to talk about the campaign to clear Alice’s name, as well as that of Alice’s daughter Winnie and son-in-law Alfred Mason (who were convicted alongside her).

Bodkin v Bodkin by Emily Johns

Bodkin v Bodkin by Emily Johns

Come and visit Hearing Eye at the 2014 Poetry Bookfair. We have a reading at 11am featuring Anna Robinson, Krysia Mansfield, Alan Brownjohn and Dan Kennedy who have been commissioned by Hearing Eye and Peace News to write a series of poems about resistance to the First World War in a project called The World is My Country.

Free Verse is an all-day bazaar, market, library, meeting place, performance venue, information resource and more. Celebrating the vitality of contemporary poetry in the UK, publishers both large and small, both experimental and traditional, display and sell their work direct to the public.

Free Verse 2014 will be held on Saturday 6th September, 10am-4.30pm, at Conway Hall in London, with an evening do at the nearby Rugby Tavern for a grand night of poetry and socialising.



Thank you all for your support of Torriano Meeting House. There were nearly 800 entries to the competition this year. A special thank you to our  judge, Angela Kirby and to June English and Patricia Griffin for all their hard work in the competition organisation and administration. A cheque for £1,100 was presented to Torriano Meeting House by the Torriano Support Fund.

A pamphlet of the winning poems will be produced  later this year.

1st Prize

‘Daxon Frazer’ Joan Michelson

2nd Prize

‘Two Mill Girls’ Callum Coles

 Joint 3rd

‘Norman’ Christopher North

‘Glass Saint’ Kaye Lee

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Bodkin v Bodkin by Emily Johns

Bodkin v Bodkin by Emily Johns

Hearing Eye is collaborating with Peace News’s The World is my Country project celebrating key figures and events from the First World War anti-war movement – including figures and events from Germany & the Global South - bringing their stories and chutzpah alive for a new generation.

In July we will be publishing five posters with poems by Alan Brownjohn, Anna Robinson, Mererid Hopwood and songs by Dan Kennedy and Krysia Mansfield. Emily Johns Hearing Eye illustrator and co-editor of Peace News will be creating a series of 10 visual posters.



Review by Dzifa Benson in Tears in the Fence No 58 Winter 2013/14

Son of a Shoemaker by Linda Black

son of a shoemaker“These poems sit squarely in the realm of experimental not just because they are prose poems…the poems are best gauged in a cumulative fashion, as one would do with a piece of music where the whole adds up to more than the sum of its parts. The rewards of approaching the collection in this way become more apparent on re-reading….It begins to dawn on the reader just how clever the poet has been….When this realisation is added to the rich visual imagery contained in lines like ‘A piece of glass no bigger than a tile inserted itself in a morsel of sky’ makes for very satisfactory, revealing reading especially when you dip into the poems again and again.” Full review available in Tears in the Fence.



The Wolf Inside

Coming January 2014

Buy here from Inpress booksellers

The Wolf Inside Donald Gardner

Anthony Howell in ‘Fortnightly Review’ on Donald Gardner’s ‘Wolf Inside’

“Until now we have had to rely on chap-books to find Gardner’s work. He has lived in Holland for the last twenty-five years and is well known as a translator of Dutch writing, while his own poetry has been marginalised – I’d like to say “inexplicably”, but it’s clear as daylight: Back in the early seventies, Gardner was associated with “the beats”. His poetry was open, free, performative – not at all to the taste of the UK poetry establishment – which is closed, enslaved and wedded to the page. Gardner’s verse remains free. The form follows the cadences of a speaking voice, but actually it deftly espouses a tightness which is pretty economical. Every word counts, but Gardner camouflages his thriftiness in dry wit and, when you hear him read he captivates you immediately, for the poems are perfectly accessible and delivered with a stentorian intonation that reminds me of recordings by Ezra Pound.”

 


A Thorn in the Flesh by Eddie Linden

Could he be the author of Hearing Eye’s A Thorn in the Flesh? Could he be the subject of a book by Sebastian Barker? Could he be the well-known editor of the literary journal Aquarius?  Find out by listening to the Scottish Poetry Library‘s recently recorded podcast here.